FEATURED NON-FICTION

Free John Shirley Interview

Free John Shirley Interview

By Kelly Burnette

Posted 29th March 2013

From the outset of A Song Called Youth when John Shirley alludes to Yeats’ masterpiece The Second Coming in the form of a battery-powered spy drone, a small mechanical bird, he telegraphs to the reader the theme of entropy. It’s an unsettling theme as we emerge from the most violent century in human history, only to appear to be heading down the same paths as before. Yet what makes this century all the more difficult for humanity is the urgency with which we must deal with the consequences of the technology we’ve inundated ourselves with, and what makes our age marked with even more anxiety is our sluggishness to respond to potentially life-threatening, self-created problems.

What happens to the individual in a world in the grips of an economic system that dominates governments and our environment? How does a person act when he or she is caught in the downward spiral of a world whose only prevailing paradigm is power, and how do people organize around humane principles in order to fight inhumanity? What is our identity in the morass of messages in which we are drowning? Our foes are formidable. This, more than anything else, is what Shirley’s fiction explores.

Read more

Kelly Burnette

Kelly Burnette

Kelly Burnette is currently editing and contributing to the fledgling webzine DECAYKE. He plans on avoiding incarceration and dogma.

Kelly donated this interview for NW and has our eternal gratitude.

MORE NON-FICTION

The Book of Marx

The Book of Marx

It's easy to knock the fundamentalists. But they do have a point. They understand, better than their liberal brother and sisters do, that without its traditional terrifying threats Christianity has nothing much to offer, and that only a rock-solid infallible revelation could make the threats remotely credible. Contrary to Stephen Jay Gould, Rock of Ages really does crash on the age of rocks. It's the liberal Christians that really bother me. They don't get me angry, like the creationists do, but they leave me puzzled. What are they thinking, all these nice friendly vicars and ministers? They do a lot of good in the world, no disputing that, and they're lovely people. They do a lot more good than I do, I'll tell you that for nothing, and most of them are much nicer than I am. But they go on expounding scripture and preaching from it in a way that would only make sense if it was indeed inspired, even if not inerrant. If I believed what they've been taught about how the Bible got cobbled together, I'd think it as just as much of a hoax as they (no doubt) regard the Book of Mormon, and I'd be an out and out unbeliever. Oh, wait – I do, and I am.   

Read more
Brian Aldiss interview part 2

Brian Aldiss interview part 2

These interviews were conducted by James D C and first broadcast on his Atomic Bark web cast.

 Atmic Bark link

Read more